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  • Academic year vs Fiscal year vs Calendar Year
    • Academic year: Begins with the Summer term of one year and ends with the Spring term of the following year (e.g., Summer 2018-Spring 2019 is Academic Year 2018-19)
    • Fiscal year: A fiscal year runs July 1 of one year to June 30 of the following year (e.g., July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019 is Fiscal Year 2019)
    • Calendar year: The commonly known year that runs January 1-December 31

    Pertains to what population of students: All
  • Campus
    For the purposes of IPEDS reporting, there are five campuses in the UNM system: Main, Taos, Valencia, Gallup and Los Alamos. However, NMHED considers the Doctor of Medicine program in the HSC to be a separate campus.
    Pertains to what population of students: All
  • Demographics
    Information about a person, such as ethnicity, gender, address, nationality, etc.
    Pertains to what population of students: All
  • Ethnicity
    A student's self-reported ethnicity based on U.S. Federal categories established in 2010; These categories include: Hispanic, American Indian, Asian, African-American, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, White, Two or More Races, Ethnicity Unknown, and Non-Resident Alien. See the NCES guidelines for ethnicity reporting here.
    Students who are categorized as Hispanic may have reported themselves to be Hispanic and some other race, but Hispanic ethnicity trumps all others. The Two or More Races category.
    At UNM, we typically use "International" rather than "Non-Resident Alien," as the word 'alien' can be problematic.
    The Non-Resident Alien/International category includes all students who are not US Citizens or Permanent Residence (i.e., green card holders).
    Pertains to what population of students: All
  • First-time, Full-time (FTFT) Freshmen
    Students who are attending college for the first time, and they are attending as full-time students (enrolled for 12 or more credit hours in the first semester).
    Pertains to what population of students: Undergraduate students.
  • Freshman cohort
    Students who enroll in a given fall semester as degree-seeking, undergraduate-level students for the first time. For the purposes of determining a fall freshman cohort, these students begin a degree program in the fall or summer semester of the given year. Students who enroll as first-time freshmen in the spring do not count in the freshman cohort, but will be counted in the full-year cohort for the IPEDS Outcome Measures survey.
    Information about freshman cohorts from the last ten years can be found on OIA's Freshman Cohort Tracking dashboard.
    Pertains to what population of students: Undergraduate Students.
  • Freshman cohort vs. Freshman classification
    While most members of the first-time freshman cohort are also classified as freshmen (with fewer than 27 credit hours), not all freshmen are necessarily members of the first-time cohort. It is possible that a first-time freshman can enter UNM with 27 or more student credit hours, which would designate them as a sophomore or even a junior for the purposes of student classification.
    Students could be classified as a freshman without being a member of the first-time freshman cohort if:
    1. They enter in the Spring semester
    2. They transfer to UNM from another institution with fewer than 27 credits
    3. They enter UNM as a non-degree student

    Pertains to what population of students: Undergraduate students.
  • Frozen/census files vs. Live/MyReports data
    In order to comply with federal and state data collection requirements (as well as best practices in data curation), UNM Information Technology freezes a selection of Banner tables on the official census date each semester. In the fall and spring semester, this census date falls on the third Friday of the semester (21 days after the beginning of the term). In the summer semester, the census date is on the final Friday of the summer term. The data from these frozen tables are the basis for all official and mandatory reporting.
    Data pulled from MyReports reflects live rather than frozen data. These live data are updated every night during a regular overnight process, and will show data as of 5:00 PM the day before. It is often not possible to match data pulled from MyReports to public-facing and/or official reports generated by OIA since the latter are generated from frozen data. MyReports is best for more timely data used for tracking changes or making comparisons over a period of time (days, weeks, months, semesters, or academic years).
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • FTE
    FTE: Full Time Equivalent.
    FTE = Head count of Full time students + 1/3 * Head count of part time students.
    For purposes of the Official Enrollment Report and NMHED Reporting, FTE is calculated by summing Student Credit Hours (SCH) and dividing by the headcount (HC) of enrolled students.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Gender
    Currently, gender is reported on a binary M or F system, due to the NMHED requirement for only those two gender categories. Each student record in the raw files submitted to NMHED throughout the year must have a gender code of either M or F. Student records with missing gender codes or gender = N are not accepted in their electronic file submission system (eDEAR).
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Graduation rate
    The percentage of first-time, full-time freshmen from a particular fall cohort who graduate prior to a specific subsequent term. Generally, the graduation rate for a given freshman cohort refers to the percentage of full-time students in the cohort who graduate within 6 years, or prior to the start of the cohort's 7th fall semester. For example, the graduation rate for the 2010 freshman cohort is the percentage of students who graduated prior to the start of Fall 2017.For IPEDS reporting, this rate is often referred to as the “150% graduation rate,” as it reflects graduation within 150% of the expected time to finish a bachelor's degree.
    Graduation rates are computed based on 4, 5, 6, or 8 year time periods, and generally include only students who began as first-time, full-time freshmen. The Outcome Measures survey calculates a graduation rate for other groups of undergraduate students, including first-time part-time students, transfer-in students, and students who transfer out.
    While there is currently no established official methodology for calculating graduation rates for master's and doctoral students, it is possible to determine a graduation rate with a few parameters in place; namely, the initial term of matriculation and the term by which these students may have graduated.
    Pertains to what population of students: Undergraduates; First-time, full-time freshmen.
  • Head count
    Actual number of enrolled students; typically reported as unduplicated totals (i.e., when reporting on full academic year headcounts, students are only counted once rather than by semester).
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • IPEDS
    Acronym for Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System; A set of surveys from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) designed to collect and share information on institutions of higher education pertaining to enrollments, degrees, demographics, human resources, financial aid, admissions, academic libraries, and finance.
    These surveys are administered at the federal level and are required of all institutions of higher education that participate in, or are applicants for participation in, any federal financial assistance program authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965.
    The data for these surveys are collected on an annual basis using a pre-determined data collection cycle that runs August-October, December-February, and December-April. You can see more details on the data collection schedule here. Previously reported data (including executive summary reports, raw data, and overviews) can be found in the IPEDS Data Center.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Major vs Program vs Concentration
    Areas of study being offered by the various colleges in the university are generally known as majors or programs. However, a program incorporates the level of study and the degree of the student while a major is simply the area of study. The program is thus the specific degree being conferred on the student after graduation. A concentration is a specialization within certain majors. Not all colleges have majors with concentrations.
    For example, the College of Arts and Sciences (college) may offer a Chemistry (CHEM) major. More specifically, the college offers a Chemistry major with BA Chemistry, BS Chemistry, MS Chemistry and PhD Chemistry programs which correspond to Bachelors, Master's, and PhD degrees in the field.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Min/Max Ethnicity
    In the Official Enrollment Report (OER), the disaggregation by ethnicity and gender shows both a Minimum and a Maximum ethnicity count. For the Hispanic, Race/Ethnicity Unknown, and Foreign categories, these two numbers will be the same. This is because self-identified Hispanic ethnicity supersedes all other racial/ethnic identifications, per federal guidelines. Any student who selects Hispanic, whether alone or in conjunction with other race/ethnicity categories, will be classified as a Hispanic student. Race/Ethnicity Unknown and Foreign are categories to classify students who choose not to self-identify and students who are not U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents (respectively). The Two or More Races category only has a minimum value, since it is an aggregated category.
    For all other racial/ethnic categories, the minimum count represents the number of students who self-selected that category and no other categories. The maximum count reflects the total number of students who selected that category, whether alone or alongside other categories. For example, a student who self-identifies as White, African-American, and Asian will be counted in the minimum column for "Two or More Races", but will be counted in the maximum column for White, African-American, and Asian. Thus, the total in the maximum column will necessarily exceed the actual headcounts, whereas the minimum column will always equal the actual headcount.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • NMHED
    Acronym for the New Mexico Higher Education Department; The state-level governing body that oversees institutions of higher education and collects data pertaining to students for purposes of compliance, record-keeping, and analysis. OIA submits raw data files to the NMHED multiple times per year with record-level information on enrollments, degrees, and financial aid. The files submitted to NMHED are the basis for many other reports generated throughout the year. You can learn more about the data collection schedule for NMHED here.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Retention rate
    Percentage of first-time freshmen (or freshmen cohort) who remain enrolled in a subsequent semester. For example, the 1-year retention rate for the 2015 freshmen cohort reflects the percentage of students in the cohort who remain enrolled at the start of the fall 2016 semester. The “retention rate” for a given freshmen cohort generally refers to the 1-year rate, or 3rd-semester retention.
    While there is currently no established official methodology for calculating retention rates for master's and doctoral students, it is possible to determine a retention rate with a few parameters in place; namely, the initial term of matriculation and the time frame in which you are measuring continued enrollment.
    Pertains to what population of students: First-time freshmen.
  • SCH
    SCH: Student Credit Hours.
    SCH is the summation of all credit hours taken by students in a given course, subject, semester, campus, or level.
    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Student Classification
    Provides information on both level of study and class level.
    • CC: Concurrent Enrollment
    • G1: Graduate, First Masters
    • G2: Graduate, Second Masters
    • G3: Graduate, Doctoral
    • G4: Graduate, Certificate Program
    • G6: Graduate, Doctoral Candidate
    • G8: Graduate, MFA
    • G9: Graduate, MFA Candidates
    • L1-L3: Law, Years 1-3
    • MA: Medical School, Phase 1, Year 1
    • MB: Medical School, Phase 1, Year 2
    • M2: Medical School, Phase 2, Year 3
    • M3: Medical School, Phase 3, Year 4
    • N2-N4: Nursing, Levels II-IV
    • NG: Non-degree graduate student
    • NU: Non-degree undergraduate student
    • P1-P4: Pharmacy, Years 1-4
    • UA: Freshman, First Year First Semester
    • UB: Freshman, First Year Second Semester
    • U2: Sophomore
    • U3: Junior
    • U4: Senior

    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Student Level
    Students are categorized based on the level of study as follows:
    • NU: Non-degree Undergraduate; Includes non-degree students who have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree, concurrent enrollment students, and dual credit students.
    • AD: Associate's; Includes all degree-seeking students at branch campuses pursuing an Associate's degree (AA/AS/AAS) or a certificate at a branch campus (less than one year, one-year, or one to two-year certificates) . Typically takes courses with course numbers ranging from 100-299.
    • UG: Undergraduate; Includes all degree-seeking students at the baccalaureate level and undergraduate certificates (one-year, one to two year and two-year certificates). Typically takes courses with course numbers ranging from 100-499. Only Main Campus has UG-level programs, although UG-level students may take courses at branch campuses.
    • NG: Non-degree Graduate; Includes all non-degree seeking students who already hold a baccalaureate degree, regardless of the level of courses being taken.
    • GR: Graduate; Includes degree-seeking students in all Master's and Doctoral degree programs (aside from Doctor of Medicine, Juris Doctor, and Doctor of Pharmacy).
    • DM: Doctor of Medicine; Only applies to students in the School of Medicine pursuing a Doctor of Medicine degree.
    • LW: Law; Includes degree-seeking students in the School of Law pursuing a Juris Doctor degree. Students in the School of Law who are pursuing the MSL Studies in Law degree are considered Graduate students and not Law students.
    • PH: Pharmacy; Includes degree-seeking students in the College of Pharmacy who are pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree and who have completed undergraduate-level study.

    Pertains to what population of students: All.
  • Time to degree
    Time to degree is determined by calculating the number of years a student takes to complete a degree from the initial semester of matriculation in that degree program. Time to degree differs from graduation rates in that time to degree reflects the number of years taken to complete a degree program, and graduation rates reflect the percentage of students in a given cohort or group who complete their degree programs within a given time frame (typically 4, 5, or 6 years in the case of undergraduate students).
    Time to degree for first-time, full-time freshmen by college and program can be accessed here.
    Pertains to what population of students: All degree-seeking students.